Geothermal Energy Source

Geothermal Energy Source

Geothermal Energy Source
According to the studies performed by geologists, geothermal power plants with 250-MW generating capacity are possible in desert areas. Such a geothermal power plant can meet more than 10 percent of electricity requirements for military bases, where ample lands are available for solar panel installations. Geothermal power plants generate the electricity through wells, which can be a thousand feet deep into the earth. These wells bring heat to the surface by drawing hot water or steam generated from the high-temperature cracks in the earth. The hot water can be used to heat the base buildings, quarters for military personnel, and university research laboratories. The steam can be used to drive a turbine-generator set to generate electricity. This steam is not superheated and is only suitable to drive low-speed turbine-generator sets.
Finding the best spots to drill deep wells can be tricky as well as expensive. Geothermal electric power plants require the services of experienced geologists to find out the most suitable locations for geothermal power plant installation, which could be costly. A quick scan through Google Earth images can reveal pressurized linear features that could turn out to be faulty. Selection of the right location requires analysis of the rocks, examination of soil densities, and comprehensive evaluation of characteristics of the subsurface water, in addition to magnetic and gravitational field measurements of the site selected. A sudden and unusual magnetometer reading suggests the presence of a flowing fluid in the rock, which points to a well-defined location for the geothermal energy source [3]. However, experimentation using 鈥淟IDAR鈥?laser imagery would add more certainty to the geothermal site selection. In brief, finding the right location for the geothermal energy source [3] is time consuming and costly, but this energy source has no greenhouse effects and is independent of foreign oil.